Tag Archives: Nexus 4

Google I/O 2013: Did a white Nexus 4 with Android 4.3 hide out at Google IO?

Google’s opening day the IO keynote was heavy on the dev news and upgrades yet light on major announcements, and pushed hardware to the back burner in a rather intriguing fashion.

Nexus 4 with Android 4.3

Yet there may be a bit of kit hiding in the Moscone Center’s halls, an alternately hued handset we could see launch as soon as next month.

According to Android and Me, the rumored white Nexus 4 was more than just a keynote no-show at this year’s conference, appearing behind the scenes as a clone of the current version yet in an alabaster shell.

How does the site know? Because Taylor Wimberly, the publication’s founder, claims he laid hands on the glittery gadget.

The post-IO show

In Wimberly’s words, the phone is a “carbon copy” of the black model, and will arrive on the Google Play Store June 10 with Android 4.3 on board.

We know, that’s a lot to take in.

What little there is to know about Android 4.3 indicates it won’t be an earth-shattering update, but it should bring Bluetooth Low Energy support. It may also support OpenGL for Embedded Systems 3.0, shepherding advanced graphics capabilities along with it.

Google apparently scrapped 4.3 from its keynote in favor of showing off its ability to introduce new services and APIs without bumping up Android firmware, a perspective courtesy of Android and Me’s Google sources.

We did get Google’s Galaxy 4 running stock Android 4.2, so perhaps we’re in for some more Nexus news before mid-year.

Via Techradar

Google I/O 2013: Did a white Nexus 4 with Android 4.3 hide out at Google IO?

Mystery LG handset leaks out with no physical buttons

Evleaks offers first glimpse of buttonless LG phone with unique earpiece

Prolific leaker Evleaks has posted images of what could be a future LG handset. The device, pictured on Facebook, shows a spartan front face with only an LG logo down below. There’s also a curved glass front and an unusual looking reflective earpiece. In today’s post, the leaker offers a guess that this might be the rumored Optimus G2.

Mystery LG handset

The mystery phone seems to share some design cues with the Nexus 4, but there’s no suggestion at all that this is a Nexus device — for one, LG’s branding is very much front and center. But it could indicate a change of tack for LG, if it’s to join the likes of Motorola and Sony with a push towards on-screen buttons. (It’s a move that would undoubtedly please Android purists.)

For the moment that’s about all we can surmise from an image showing a featureless phone with a blank screen. If you’ve got any theories of your own, be sure to shout out in the comments. The original image is linked below, as is a close-up of the bezel.

Phil weighing in here: The Optimus G Pro has nicely hidden buttons as well. I’m willing to bed there are a couple on either side of that LG Logo.

Via Androidcentral, Source: Evleaks (Originalbezel close-up)

Mystery LG handset leaks out with no physical buttons

Testing builds of Paranoid Android with Halo now available for Nexus 4 and Nexus 7

New Halo notification system is ready for testing, Nexus 4 and Nexus 7 owners can download today

A couple of days ago we talked about the upcoming Paranoid Android ROM and its new Halo feature. Part chat heads, part awesome, and a rewrite of the Android framework make this one of the neatest tricks we’ve seen in a while from any third-party development team.

Paranoid Android with Halo

Starting today, those of you with a Nexus 4 or a Nexus 7 can give it a try, as the team has made some early testing builds available for download. Be warned, these are by no means finished, and will surely have a fair share of bugs. We know that’s hardly going to stop a slew of people from giving this a try.

A build for the Oppo Find 5 is also in the works, and a Galaxy Nexus version is promised when there’s time. If you are feeling a little adventurous, and not afraid to try something new, hit the source link for the details and download links. The video of Halo in action is after the break as a refresher. Continue reading

Testing builds of Paranoid Android with Halo now available for Nexus 4 and Nexus 7

New Halo notification system is ready for testing, Nexus 4 and Nexus 7 owners can download today

A couple of days ago we talked about the upcoming Paranoid Android ROM and its new Halo feature. Part chat heads, part awesome, and a rewrite of the Android framework make this one of the neatest tricks we’ve seen in a while from any third-party development team.

Paranoid Android with Halo

Starting today, those of you with a Nexus 4 or a Nexus 7 can give it a try, as the team has made some early testing builds available for download. Be warned, these are by no means finished, and will surely have a fair share of bugs. We know that’s hardly going to stop a slew of people from giving this a try.

A build for the Oppo Find 5 is also in the works, and a Galaxy Nexus version is promised when there’s time. If you are feeling a little adventurous, and not afraid to try something new, hit the source link for the details and download links. The video of Halo in action is after the break as a refresher. Continue reading

Google Is Working On And Testing Android 4.3 – It’s Still Jelly Bean

As everyone is trying to guess whether the next big Android update is going to be Key Lime Pie or not, and whether the release will be Android 5.X or 4.X, we have yet to hear anything concrete. After getting a tip from an eagle-eyed reader (thanks, deepayan!) and digging deeper, I can definitively tell you that Google is currently working on Android 4.3, and it is still Jelly Bean.

Android 4.3

  1. Specifically, the build I’m seeing floating around our server logs is Android 4.3 JWR23B, which indicates this is still Jelly Bean (the first letter of the build is always the same as the first letter of the Android version name).
    Now, you might say that server logs can be easily faked, and it happens all the time. You’d be absolutely right, which is why I would have never posted this had I not traced the IP range to Google itself. In fact, 2 different IP ranges, both corresponding to Google employees. Employees that have a lot to do with Android. It’s the same IP range that had previously clued us in to some of the unreleased versions of Android before they were announced.
  2. The Android 4.3 devices I’ve seen so far are Nexus 4 and Nexus 7.
  3. Furthermore, and this was the original tip that prompted me to look for more clues, there are several very recent comments in the official Chromium bug tracker that list JWR23B as a build number, giving more credibility to this finding. The person who left the comments is a Chromium developer, which suggests affinity to Google, once again.

So, what does this all mean? Here are my thoughts:

  1. Google doesn’t assign version numbers to Android releases until a short time before they’re set to be unveiled. We’re talking weeks or a couple of months max.
  2. Google does not assign version numbers to internal/test releases. Those are usually called something like JellyBeanMR1 and then assigned proper versions number when they’re close to release.
  3. Android 4.3 started appearing in the logs recently, while Android 5.X is nowhere to be found, and neither are any K***** builds.
  4. Google I/O is in less than a month.
  5. Everyone has been expecting Google to unveil the newest version of Android at the conference, as Google has traditionally done in the past. Most have suggested that it would be Android 5.0, Key Lime Pie, or some other dessert starting with K, meaning a big leap from Jelly Bean, usually requiring app compatibility updates and bringing serious architectural changes. Think Android 3.0 compared to 2.X and Android 4.0 compared to 2.X and 3.X. That kind of big.
  6. Recently, a rumor started floating around that the next major revision is going to be delayed to give OEMs (and developers) some breathing space.
  7. We now know that Google is working on Android 4.3, which is still Jelly Bean. Today’s findings suggest (this part is in my opinion, not a fact) that the company is going to unveil 4.3 and not 5.X at Google I/O. I may end up being wrong on this one, but all the clues are lining up pretty well to fit this theory.
  8. The versioning likely points to OS changes that are not too drastic for developers to adapt their apps to and OEMs to upgrade devices to. Think Android 2.0 -> 2.1, 2.1 -> 2.2, 4.0 -> 4.1, and 4.1 -> 4.2 (especially the latter). This is a good thing – as we know, Jelly Bean can be found on only 25% of devices, and that’s after Google reworked the algorithm used to report these numbers.

Update: Reddit user danrant has chimed in with a whole bunch of other evidence that points to an incremental Jelly Bean release rather than Key Lime Pie. Go read his comment here.

Still with me? Good.

Of course, none of the information uncovered today gets us any closer to the list of features we can expect in the next announced version of Android, but either the leaks or Google I/O itself will tell us in just about 3 weeks.

[Via Androidpolice]

Google Is Working On And Testing Android 4.3 – It’s Still Jelly Bean

iPlayer for Android update brings improved experience on Galaxy S III, Note 2 and Nexus 4, tablets to follow

Excuse us while we interrupt your episode of The Archers, but we thought users of BBC’s iPlayer might like to know about the latest Android app update. Amongst the usual bug fixes, the update promises to offer a “much improved” viewing experience on big hitting devices such as…